Global Ocean Sediment Composition and Burial Flux in the Deep Sea

Christopher T. Hayes*, Kassandra M. Costa, Robert F. Anderson, Eva Calvo, Zanna Chase, Ludmila L. Demina, Jean Claude Dutay, Christopher R. German, Lars Eric Heimbürger-Boavida, Samuel L. Jaccard, Allison Jacobel, Karen E. Kohfeld, Marina D. Kravchishina, Jörg Lippold, Figen Mekik, Lise Missiaen, Frank J. Pavia, Adina Paytan, Rut Pedrosa-Pamies, Mariia V. PetrovaShaily Rahman, Laura F. Robinson, Matthieu Roy-Barman, Anna Sanchez-Vidal, Alan Shiller, Alessandro Tagliabue, Allyson C. Tessin, Marco van Hulten, Jing Zhang

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

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Abstract

Quantitative knowledge about the burial of sedimentary components at the seafloor has wide-ranging implications in ocean science, from global climate to continental weathering. The use of 230Th-normalized fluxes reduces uncertainties that many prior studies faced by accounting for the effects of sediment redistribution by bottom currents and minimizing the impact of age model uncertainty. Here we employ a recently compiled global data set of 230Th-normalized fluxes with an updated database of seafloor surface sediment composition to derive atlases of the deep-sea burial flux of calcium carbonate, biogenic opal, total organic carbon (TOC), nonbiogenic material, iron, mercury, and excess barium (Baxs). The spatial patterns of major component burial are mainly consistent with prior work, but the new quantitative estimates allow evaluations of deep-sea budgets. Our integrated deep-sea burial fluxes are 136 Tg C/yr CaCO3, 153 Tg Si/yr opal, 20Tg C/yr TOC, 220 Mg Hg/yr, and 2.6 Tg Baxs/yr. This opal flux is roughly a factor of 2 increase over previous estimates, with important implications for the global Si cycle. Sedimentary Fe fluxes reflect a mixture of sources including lithogenic material, hydrothermal inputs and authigenic phases. The fluxes of some commonly used paleo-productivity proxies (TOC, biogenic opal, and Baxs) are not well-correlated geographically with satellite-based productivity estimates. Our new compilation of sedimentary fluxes provides detailed regional and global information, which will help refine the understanding of sediment preservation.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere2020GB006769
JournalGlobal Biogeochemical Cycles
Volume35
Issue number4
Early online date24 Mar 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study was supported by the Past Global Changes (PAGES) project, which in turn received support from the Swiss Academy of Sciences and the US-NSF. The work grew out of a 2018 workshop in Aix-Marseille, France, funded by PAGES, GEOTRACES, SCOR, US-NSF, Aix Marseille Universit?, and John Cantle Scientific, and the authors would like to acknowledge all attendees of this meeting. The authors acknowledge the participants of the 68th cruise of RV Akademik Mstislav Keldysh for helping acquire samples. Christopher T. Hayes acknowledges support from US-NSF awards 1658445 and 1737023. Some data compilation on Arctic shelf seas was supported by the Russian Science Foundation, grant number 20-17-00157. This work was also supported through project CRESCENDO (grant no. 641816, European Commission). Zanna Chase acknowledges support from the Australian Research Council?s Discovery Projects funding scheme (project DP180102357). Christopher R. German acknowledges US-NSF awards 1235248 and 1234827. Some colorbars used in the figures were designed by Kristen Thyng et?al.?(2016) and Patrick Rafter. Two anonymous reviewers are acknowledged for constructive reviews.

Funding Information:
This study was supported by the Past Global Changes (PAGES) project, which in turn received support from the Swiss Academy of Sciences and the US‐NSF. The work grew out of a 2018 workshop in Aix‐Marseille, France, funded by PAGES, GEOTRACES, SCOR, US‐NSF, Aix Marseille Université, and John Cantle Scientific, and the authors would like to acknowledge all attendees of this meeting. The authors acknowledge the participants of the 68th cruise of RV for helping acquire samples. Christopher T. Hayes acknowledges support from US‐NSF awards 1658445 and 1737023. Some data compilation on Arctic shelf seas was supported by the Russian Science Foundation, grant number 20‐17‐00157. This work was also supported through project CRESCENDO (grant no. 641816, European Commission). Zanna Chase acknowledges support from the Australian Research Council’s funding scheme (project DP180102357). Christopher R. German acknowledges US‐NSF awards 1235248 and 1234827. Some colorbars used in the figures were designed by Kristen Thyng et al. ( 2016 ) and Patrick Rafter. Two anonymous reviewers are acknowledged for constructive reviews. Akademik Mstislav Keldysh Discovery Projects

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021. The Authors.

Keywords

  • barium
  • carbon cycle
  • marine atlas
  • mercury
  • opal
  • sediment burial

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