Glycaemic index and glycaemic load of breakfast predict cognitive function and mood in school children: a randomized controlled trial

R Micha, PJ Rogers, M Nelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

65 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The macronutrient composition of a breakfast that could facilitate performance after an overnight fast remains unclear. As glucose is the brain's major energy source, the interest is in investigating meals differing in their blood glucose-raising potential. Findings vary due to unaccounted differences in glucoregulation, arousal and cortisol secretion. We investigated the effects of meals differing in glycaemic index (GI) and glycaemic load (GL) on cognition and mood in school children. A total of seventy-four school children were matched and randomly allocated either to the high-GL or low-GL group. Within each GL group, children received high-GI and low-GI breakfasts. Cognitive function (CF) and mood were measured 95-140 min after breakfast. Blood glucose and salivary cortisol were measured at baseline, before and after the CF tests. Repeated-measures ANOVA was used to identify differences in CF, mood, glucose and cortisol levels between the breakfasts. Low-GI meals predicted feeling more alert and happy, and less nervous and thirsty (P
Translated title of the contributionGlycaemic index and glycaemic load of breakfast predict cognitive function and mood in school children: a randomized controlled trial
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1552 - 1561
Number of pages10
JournalBritish Journal of Nutrition
Volume106
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2011

Structured keywords

  • Brain and Behaviour
  • Nutrition and Behaviour

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