High diet quality is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality in older men

Janice L Atkins, Peter H Whincup, Richard W Morris, Lucy T Lennon, Olia Papacosta, S Goya Wannamethee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although diet quality is implicated in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, few studies have investigated the relation between diet quality and the risks of CVD and mortality in older adults. This study examined the prospective associations between dietary scores and risk of CVD and all-cause mortality in older British men. A total of 3328 men (aged 60-79 y) from the British Regional Heart Study, free from CVD at baseline, were followed up for 11.3 y for CVD and mortality. Baseline food-frequency questionnaire data were used to generate 2 dietary scores: the Healthy Diet Indicator (HDI), based on WHO dietary guidelines, and the Elderly Dietary Index (EDI), based on a Mediterranean-style dietary intake, with higher scores indicating greater compliance with dietary recommendations. Cox proportional hazards regression analyses assessed associations between quartiles of HDI and EDI and risk of all-cause mortality, CVD mortality, CVD events, and coronary heart disease (CHD) events. During follow-up, 933 deaths, 327 CVD deaths, 582 CVD events, and 307 CHD events occurred. Men in the highest compared with the lowest EDI quartile had significantly lower risks of all-cause mortality (HR: 0.75; 95% CI: 0.60, 0.94; P-trend = 0.03), CVD mortality (HR: 0.63; 95% CI: 0.42, 0.94; P-trend = 0.03), and CHD events (HR: 0.66; 95% CI: 0.45, 0.97; P-trend = 0.05) but not CVD events (HR: 0.79; 95% CI: 0.60, 1.05; P-trend = 0.16) after adjustment for sociodemographic, behavioral, and cardiovascular risk factors. The HDI was not significantly associated with any of the outcomes. The EDI appears to be more useful than the HDI for assessing diet quality in relation to CVD and morality risk in older men. Encouraging older adults to adhere to the guidelines inherent in the EDI criteria may have public health benefits.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)673-80
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume144
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2014

Keywords

  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Cardiovascular Diseases
  • Death Certificates
  • Diet, Mediterranean
  • Follow-Up Studies
  • Food Habits
  • Great Britain
  • Guidelines as Topic
  • Humans
  • Incidence
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Nutrition Assessment
  • Prevalence
  • Prospective Studies
  • Risk Factors
  • Risk Reduction Behavior

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