Higher systolic blood pressure in early-mid adulthood is associated with poorer cognitive performance in those with a dominantly inherited Alzheimer's disease mutation but not in non-carriers. Results from the DIAN study

Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN), Ying Xu, Htein Linn Aung, Randall J Bateman, William S Brooks, Jasmeer Chhatwal, Gregory S Day, Anne M Fagan, Martin R Farlow, Brian Gordon, Patrick G Kehoe, Johannes Levin, Hiroshi Mori, John C Morris, Whitney Wharton, Peter Humburg, Peter R Schofield, Ruth Peters*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN) is a longitudinal observational study that collects data on cognition, blood pressure (BP), and other variables from autosomal-dominant Alzheimer's disease mutation carriers (MCs) and non-carrier (NC) family members in early to mid-adulthood, providing a unique opportunity to evaluate BP and cognition relationships in these populations.

METHOD: We examined cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between systolic and diastolic BP and cognition in DIAN MC and NC.

RESULTS: Data were available from 528 participants, who had a mean age of 38 (SD = 11) and were 42% male and 61% MCs, at a median follow-up of 2 years. Linear-multilevel models found only cross-sectional associations in the MC group between higher systolic BP and poorer performance on language (β = -0.181 [-0.318, -0.044]), episodic memory (-0.212 [-0.375, -0.049]), and a composite cognitive measure (-0.146 [-0.276, -0.015]). In NCs, the relationship was cross-sectional only and present for language alone.

DISCUSSION: Higher systolic BP was cross-sectionally but not longitudinally associated with poorer cognition, particularly in MCs. BP may influence cognition gradually, but further longitudinal research is needed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4999-5009
Number of pages11
JournalAlzheimer's and Dementia
Volume19
Issue number11
Early online date23 Apr 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Nov 2023

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Data collection and sharing for this project was supported by the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN, U19AG032438), funded by the National Institute on Aging (NIA), the Alzheimer's Association (SG-20-690363-DIAN), the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Raul Carrea Institute for Neurological Research (FLENI), partial support by Research and Development Grants for Dementia from Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development, (AMED), and the Korea Health Technology R&D Project through the Korea Health Industry Development Institute (KHIDI), Spanish Institute of Health Carlos III (ISCIII), Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), Canadian Consortium of Neurodegeneration and Aging, Brain Canada Foundation, and Fonds de Recherche du Québec – Santé. This manuscript was reviewed by DIAN study investigators for scientific content and consistency of data interpretation with previous DIAN study publications. We acknowledge the altruism of the participants and their families and the contributions of the DIAN research and support staff at each of the participating sites for their contributions to this study. This work was not separately funded.

Funding Information:
Data collection and sharing for this project was supported by the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network (DIAN, U19AG032438), funded by the National Institute on Aging (NIA), the Alzheimer's Association (SG‐20‐690363‐DIAN), the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), Raul Carrea Institute for Neurological Research (FLENI), partial support by Research and Development Grants for Dementia from Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development, (AMED), and the Korea Health Technology R&D Project through the Korea Health Industry Development Institute (KHIDI), Spanish Institute of Health Carlos III (ISCIII), Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), Canadian Consortium of Neurodegeneration and Aging, Brain Canada Foundation, and Fonds de Recherche du Québec – Santé. This manuscript was reviewed by DIAN study investigators for scientific content and consistency of data interpretation with previous DIAN study publications. We acknowledge the altruism of the participants and their families and the contributions of the DIAN research and support staff at each of the participating sites for their contributions to this study. This work was not separately funded.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 The Authors. Alzheimer's & Dementia published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of Alzheimer's Association.

Structured keywords

  • Dementia Research Group

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