Hospital management of self-harm patients and risk of repetition: Systematic review and meta-analysis

R Carroll, C Metcalfe, D Gunnell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Self-harm is a common reason for hospital presentation; however, evidence to guide clinical management of these patients to reduce their risk of repeat self-harm and suicide is lacking.

METHODS: We undertook a systematic review to investigate whether between study differences in reported clinical management of self-harm patients were associated with the risk of repeat self-harm and suicide.

RESULTS: Altogether 64 prospective studies were identified that described the clinical care of self-harm patients and the incidence of repeat self-harm and suicide. The proportion of a cohort psychosocially assessed was not associated with the recorded incidence of repeat self-harm or suicide; the incidence of repeat self-harm was 16.7% (95% CI 13.8-20.1) in studies in the lowest tertile of assessment levels and 19.0% (95% CI 15.7-23.0) in the highest tertile. There was no association of repeat self-harm with differing levels of hospital admission (n=47 studies) or receiving specialist follow-up (n=12 studies). In studies reporting on levels of hospital admission and suicide (n=5), cohorts where a higher proportion of patients were admitted to a hospital bed reported a lower incidence of subsequent suicide (0.6%, 95% CI 0.5-0.8) compared to cohorts with lower levels of admission (1.9%, 95% CI 1.1-3.2).

LIMITATIONS: In some analyses power was limited due to the small number of studies reporting the exposures of interest. Case mix and aspects of care are likely to vary between studies.

DISCUSSION: There is little clear evidence to suggest routine aspects of self-harm patient care, including psychosocial assessment, reduce the risk of subsequent suicide and repeat self-harm.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)476-483
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Affective Disorders
Volume168C
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Oct 2014

Bibliographical note

Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Structured keywords

  • Centre for Surgical Research

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