How do I know what I feel? Evidence for the role of self categorisation in symptom perceptions

L St Claire, A Clift, L Dumbelton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper extends the self-categorisation model of symptom appraisals to predict that individuals who believe they have a given illness will perceive concurrent symptoms relevant to that illness to be more severe when they categorise themselves as members of a group of people with that illness. These predictions are supported with opportunity samples of individuals reporting, or not reporting a common cold (Study 1, N = 60) and reporting colds or tinnitus (Study 2, N = 64). In both studies, relevant symptoms were rated as more severe when illness group memberships were salient. The methodological, theoretical and clinical implications of these findings and possible therapeutic applications of self-categorisation theory to symptom perceptions are discussed.
Translated title of the contributionHow do I know what I feel? Evidence for the role of self categorisation in symptom perceptions
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)173 - 186
JournalEuropean Journal of Social Psychology
Volume38
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Bibliographical note

Publisher: Wiley

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