Impact of banning smoking in cars with children on exposure to second-hand smoke: a natural experiment in England and Scotland

Anthony A Laverty, Thomas Hone, Eszter P Vamos, Philip E Anyanwu, David Taylor-Robinson, Frank de Vocht, Christopher Millett, Nicholas S Hopkinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

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Abstract

England banned smoking in cars carrying children in 2015 and Scotland in 2016. We used survey data from 3 years for both countries (NEngland=3483-6920, NScotland=232-319) to assess effects of the English ban using logistic regression within a difference-in-differences framework. Among children aged 13-15 years, self-reported levels of regular exposure to smoke in cars for Scotland were 3.4% in 2012, 2.2% in 2014 and 1.3% in 2016 and for England 6.3%, 5.9% and 1.6%. The ban in England was associated with a -4.1% (95% CI -4.9% to -3.3%) absolute reduction (72% relative reduction) in exposure to tobacco smoke among children.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages3
JournalThorax
Early online date27 Jan 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 27 Jan 2020

Keywords

  • Smoking
  • passive exposure
  • epidemiology
  • evaluation
  • natural experiments

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