Impact of flight trajectory on the detection and selection of flowers by nectar-feeding bats

Alessio Balleri*, Hugh D. Griffiths, Karl Woodbridge, Chris J. Baker, Marc W. Holderied

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference Contribution (Conference Proceeding)

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Echolocating mammals, such as bats, have evolved an excellent ability to detect, select and identify the targets they depend on for their survival by echolocation even in the most challenging environments. They simultaneously adapt their trajectory and diversify transmission parameters such as waveform, bandwidth and time duration, to obtain high level detection and classification performance that is far better than that obtained by modern radar and sonar systems. This paper exploits the information available to the bat along its in-flight trajectory aiming at assessing the impact of choosing the right trajectory on detection and classification performance. A set of experimental data consisting of HRRPs of one inflorescence of Rhytidophyllum auriculatum is analysed and results are discussed and related to the case of radar and sonar systems.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2010 2nd International Workshop on Cognitive Information Processing, CIP2010
Pages350-353
Number of pages4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Nov 2010
Event2010 2nd International Workshop on Cognitive Information Processing, CIP2010 - Elba Island, United Kingdom
Duration: 14 Jun 201016 Jun 2010

Conference

Conference2010 2nd International Workshop on Cognitive Information Processing, CIP2010
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityElba Island
Period14/06/1016/06/10

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Impact of flight trajectory on the detection and selection of flowers by nectar-feeding bats'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this