Implicit and explicit understanding of ambiguous figures by adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Melissa L Allen, Alison Chambers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can process
both interpretations of an ambiguous figure (e.g. rabbit/duck) when
told about the ambiguity, however they tend not to do so spontaneously.
Here we show that although adolescents with ASD can explicitly
experience such ?reversals?, implicit measures suggest they are conceptually processing the images differently from learning disabled peers.
Participants copied the same ambiguous figures under different contextual conditions, both before and after reversal experience. Results suggest that adolescents with ASD are not influenced by contextual information when copying ambiguous drawings, since they produce similar pictures before and after reversal, compared with controls.
This research has implications for how individuals with ASD understand multiple representations and supports the Enhanced Perceptual Functioning theory.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)457-472
Number of pages16
JournalAutism
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2011

Keywords

  • ambiguous figures
  • conceptual
  • copying
  • enhanced perceptual functioning
  • representation

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