In the DNA Exoneration Cases, Eyewitness Memory Was Not the Problem: A Reply to Berkowitz and Frenda (2018) and Wade, Nash, and Lindsay (2018)

John T Wixted, Laura Mickes, Ronald P Fisher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)

Abstract

The available real-world evidence suggests that, on an initial test, eyewitness memory is often reliable. Ironically, even the DNA exoneration cases-which generally involved nonpristine testing conditions and which are usually construed as an indictment of eyewitness memory-show how reliable an initial test of eyewitness memory can be in the real world. We endorse the use of pristine testing procedures, but their absence does not automatically imply that eyewitness memory is unreliable.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)343-345
Number of pages3
JournalPerspectives on Psychological Science
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2018

Structured keywords

  • Cognitive Science
  • Memory

Keywords

  • DNA
  • Humans
  • Memory
  • Mental Recall

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