Incidence of hepatitis C in drug injectors: the role of homelessness, opiate substitution treatment, equipment sharing, and community size

N Craine, M Hickman, J Parry, J Smitth, A Walker, D Russell, B Nix, M May, T McDonald, M Lyons

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

SUMMARY A prospective cohort study estimated the incidence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in drug injectors in South Wales (UK). In total, 286/481 eligible seronegative individuals were followed up after approximately 12 months. Dried blood spot samples were collected and tested for anti-HCV antibody and behavioural data were collected at baseline and follow-up. HCV incidence was 5.9/100 person-years [95% confidence interval (CI) 3.4-9.5]. HCV incidence was predicted by community size [incident rate ratio (IRR) 6.6, 95% CI 2.11-20.51, P=0.001], homelessness (IRR 2.9, 95% CI 1.02-8.28, P=0.047) and sharing injecting equipment (IRR 12.7, 95% CI 1.62-99.6, P=0.015). HCV incidence was reduced in individuals in opiate substitution treatment (IRR 0.34, 95% CI 0.12-0.99, P=0.047). In order to reduce follow-up bias we used multiple imputation of missing data using switching regression; after imputation estimated HCV incidence was 8.5/100 person-years (95% CI 5.4-12.7). HCV incidence varies with community size, equipment sharing and homelessness are associated with increased HCV incidence and opiate substitution treatment may be protective against HCV
Translated title of the contributionIncidence of hepatitis C in drug injectors: the role of homelessness, opiate substitution treatment, equipment sharing, and community size
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1255 - 1265
Number of pages11
JournalEpidemiology and Infection
Volume137
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2009

Bibliographical note

Other identifier: PM:19224654

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