Incorporating soil-structure interaction into seismic response analyses for buildings

Jonathan P. Stewart, George Mylonakis, Michael J. Givens, C. B. Crouse, Tara Hutchinson, Bret Lizundia, Farzad Naeim, Farhang Ostadan, Jon A. Heintz

Research output: Contribution to conferenceConference Paperpeer-review

Abstract

Soil-structure interaction (SSI) analysis evaluates the collective response and dynamic interplay of three linked systems: the structure, the foundation, and the soil underlying and surrounding the foundation. Problems associated with practical application of SSI for building structures are rooted in a poor understanding of fundamental SSI principles. Implementation in practice is hindered by a literature that is difficult to understand, and codes and standards that contain limited guidance and, in some cases, are proprietary. A recent report published by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) provides a mechanism for advancing the state of practice in SSI for practicing engineers. It offers a synthesis of the body of SSI literature, distilled into a concise narrative and harmonized under a consistent set of variables and units. In the NIST report, techniques are described by which SSI phenomena such as foundation-soil compliance and damping (inertial interaction), and foundation-to-free-field ground motion change (kinematic interaction) can be evaluated in engineering practice. Specific recommendations for modeling these and other seismic soil-structure interaction effects on building structures are provided. The resulting recommendations are illustrated and tested though simulations of two example buildings with earthquake recordings.

Original languageEnglish
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2014
Event10th U.S. National Conference on Earthquake Engineering: Frontiers of Earthquake Engineering, NCEE 2014 - Anchorage, United States
Duration: 21 Jul 201425 Jul 2014

Conference

Conference10th U.S. National Conference on Earthquake Engineering: Frontiers of Earthquake Engineering, NCEE 2014
CountryUnited States
CityAnchorage
Period21/07/1425/07/14

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