Increasing mitigation ambition to meet the Paris Agreement’s temperature goal avoids substantial heat-related mortality in U.S. cities

Y. T. Eunice Lo, Daniel M. Mitchell, Antonio Gasparrini, Ana Vicedo-Cabrera, Kristie L. Ebi, Peter Frumhoff, Richard J. Millar, William Roberts, Francesco Sera, Sarah Sparrow, Peter Uhe, Gethin Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)
181 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Current greenhouse gas mitigation ambition is consistent with ~3°C global mean warming above preindustrial levels. There is a clear need to strengthen mitigation ambition to stabilize the climate at the Paris Agreement goal of warming of less than 2°C. We specify the differences in city-level heat-related mortality between the 3°C trajectory and warming of 2° and 1.5°C. Focusing on 15 U.S. cities where reliable climate and health data are available, we show that ratcheting up mitigation ambition to achieve the 2°C threshold could avoid between 70 and 1980 annual heat-related deaths per city during extreme events (30-year return period). Achieving the 1.5°C threshold could avoid between 110 and 2720 annual heat-related deaths. Population changes and adaptation investments would alter these numbers. Our results provide compelling evidence for the heat-related health benefits of limiting global warming to 1.5°C in the United States.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbereaau4373
Number of pages9
JournalScience Advances
Volume5
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Jun 2019

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Increasing mitigation ambition to meet the Paris Agreement’s temperature goal avoids substantial heat-related mortality in U.S. cities'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this