Influences on forms of national identity and feeling 'at home' among Muslim groups in Britain, Germany and Spain

Saffron Karlsen*, James Y. Nazroo

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Muslims in Europe are increasingly constructed as problematic and insular. This article examines whether this construction may be justified and the impact this has had on the attitudes of Muslims living in different countries in Europe. Over 70 percent of Bangladeshi, Turkish and Moroccan Muslims living in Britain, Germany and Spain, respectively, felt at home' in their country of residence. This sense of being at home, and whether the events of 11 September 2001 or 11 March 2004 affected this was associated with citizenship of or birth in Europe, experiences of victimization and perceived local social support. Citizenship, experiences of discrimination and strength of religious identities were associated with reporting British, German or Spanish identities. Rather than providing evidence of self-segregation, these findings emphasize the impact of the political and social marginalization faced by Muslim groups in Europe, which significantly affects their ability to feel themselves at home there.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)689-708
Number of pages20
JournalEthnicities
Volume13
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2013

Keywords

  • Citizenship
  • ethnicity
  • exclusion
  • home
  • identity
  • marginalization
  • networks
  • religion
  • victimization
  • BRITISH PAKISTANIS
  • RACISM
  • ETHNICITY
  • ENGLAND
  • AUSTRALIA
  • POLITICS
  • RELIGION
  • PEOPLE
  • UK

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