Information and Communication Technology and Voice: Constraint or Capability

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter in a book

Abstract

To date, debates regarding legal regulation of workplace information and communication technology (ICT) have focussed on the constraints that employers can legitimately place on worker voice. In this respect, the inadequacies of a common law approach have led to various legislative initiatives (such as that relating to data protection) and acknowledgement of human rights claims (largely relating to privacy). From a capabilities perspective, it is argued here that the current legal approach can be improved in a variety of respects, not least by recognition of the potential enabling functions of ICT. We could, for example, build into legislation positive entitlements for workers and their organizsations to utilizse email and other communication mechanisms in the workplace. Further, the current sole focus on privacy rights could usefully be supplemented by greater appreciation of workers’ rights to freedom of speech and freedom of association.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationVoices at Work
Subtitle of host publicationContinuity and Change in the Common Law World
EditorsAlan Bogg, Tonia Novitz
Place of PublicationOxford
PublisherOxford University Press
Pages436-454
Number of pages19
ISBN (Print)978-0-19-968313-0
Publication statusPublished - 3 Apr 2014

Structured keywords

  • PolicyBristol
  • tTechnology, information, communication, capability, affiliation, blacklisting, data protection, human rights, privacy, freedom of speech, freedom of association.
  • PolicyBristolBusinessAndEconomicPolicy

Keywords

  • Technology, information, communication, capability, affiliation, blacklisting, data protection, human rights, privacy, freedom of speech, freedom of association

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Information and Communication Technology and Voice: Constraint or Capability'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this