Interaction effects of virtual structures

Mike Fraser*, Steve Benford

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference Contribution (Conference Proceeding)

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Complex Collaborative Virtual Environments (CVEs) are usually partitioned into a structure of discrete or nested graphical objects and spaces. The use of a structure for managing graphics and spaces allows users to perform certain actions. For example, objects can then be picked up and moved around; spaces can be separated into discrete units and individually broadcast to certain users, reducing network bandwidth requirements. However, the effects of providing particular structures on users' interaction have not been investigated. In this paper, we present an analysis of pairs of users interacting in a CVE. Our analysis highlights behaviours that are caused by the simple virtual structures it provides. We derive design issues to be considered when defining the structure of a shared virtual world.

Translated title of the contributionInteraction Effects of Virtual Structures
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 4th International Conference on Collaborative Virtual Environments
EditorsC. Greenhalgh, E. Churchill, W. Broll, C. Greenhalgh, E. Churchill, W. Broll
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Pages128-134
Number of pages7
ISBN (Print)1581134894
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2002
EventProceedings of the 4th International Conference on Collaborative Virtual Environments (CVE 2002) - Bonn, Germany
Duration: 30 Sep 20022 Oct 2002

Conference

ConferenceProceedings of the 4th International Conference on Collaborative Virtual Environments (CVE 2002)
CountryGermany
CityBonn
Period30/09/022/10/02

Bibliographical note

Conference Proceedings/Title of Journal: Third ACM Conference on Collaborative Virtual Environments (CVE'02)

Keywords

  • Object interaction
  • Partitioning strategies
  • Virtual structures

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