Intervisceral artery origins in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysmal disease; evidence for systemic vascular remodelling

Damian M Bailey, Tom G Evans, Kate Gower Thomas, Richard D White, Chistopher P Twine, Michael H Lewis, Ian M Williams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)

Abstract

NEW FINDINGS: What is the central question of this study? To what extent focal abdominal aortic aneurysmal (AAA) disease is associated with systemic remodelling of the vascular tree remains unknown. The present study examined whether anatomical differences exist between distances of the intervisceral artery origins and AAA location/size in patients with disease compared with healthy patients. What is the main finding and its importance? Intervisceral artery distances were shown to be consistently greater in AAA patients, highlighting the systemic nature of AAA disease that extends proximally to the abdominal aorta and its branches. The anatomical description of the natural variation in visceral artery origins has implications for the design of stent grafts and planning complex open aortic surgery. The initial histopathology of abdominal aortic aneurysmal (AAA) disease is atherosclerotic, later diverting towards a distinctive dilating rather than occlusive aortic phenotype. To what extent focal AAA disease is associated with systemic remodelling of the vascular tree remains unknown. The present study examined whether anatomical differences exist between the intervisceral artery origins and AAA location/size in patients with AAA disease (AAA+) relative to those without (AAA-). Preoperative contrast-enhanced computerized tomograms were reviewed in 90 consecutive AAA+ patients scheduled for open repair who underwent an infrarenal (n = 45), suprarenal (n = 26) or supracoeliac clamp (n = 19). These were compared with 39 age-matched AAA- control patients. Craniocaudal measurements were recorded from the distal origin of the coeliac artery to the superior mesenteric artery and from the origin of the superior mesenteric artery to both renal artery origins. Serial blood samples were obtained for estimation of the glomerular filtration rate before and after surgery. Intervisceral artery origins were shown to be consistently greater in AAA+ patients (P < 0.05 versus AAA-), although unrelated to AAA diameter (P > 0.05). Postoperative renal function became progressively more impaired the more proximal the clamp placement (estimated glomerular filtration rate for supracoeliac < suprarenal < infrarenal clamps, P < 0.05). These findings highlight the systemic nature of AAA disease that extends proximally to the abdominal aorta and its branches. The anatomical description of the natural variation in visceral artery origins has implications for the design of stent grafts and planning complex open aortic surgery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1143-53
Number of pages11
JournalExperimental Physiology
Volume101
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2016

Bibliographical note

© 2016 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

Keywords

  • Aged
  • Aorta, Abdominal/pathology
  • Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal/pathology
  • Female
  • Glomerular Filtration Rate/physiology
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Mesenteric Arteries/pathology
  • Renal Artery/pathology
  • Vascular Remodeling/physiology

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