Is IQ in childhood associated with suicidal thoughts and attempts? Findings from the Mater University Study of Pregnancy and its outcomes

Rosa Alati, David Gunnell, Jake Najman, Gail Williams, Debbie Lawlor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study explores associations of IQ at age 14 with adult symptoms of suicidal thoughts and attempts at age 21. Analysis was based on the Mater University Study of Pregnancy and its outcomes, an Australian prospective birth cohort study started in Brisbane Australia in 1981. We assessed associations with suicide thoughts, plans, and attempts. We used two measures of IQ: the Raven's Standard Progressive Matrices and the Wide Range Achievement Test. In multivariable analyses, there was an inverse association between Raven's IQ and suicide thoughts, plans, and attempts, but no strong evidence of an association between the WRAT3 and the three suicidal items. Specific aspects of intelligence may be associated with suicidal thoughts, plans, and attempts.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)282-93
Number of pages12
JournalSuicide and Life-Threatening Behavior
Volume39
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2009

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Child
  • Child, Preschool
  • Cohort Studies
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Infant
  • Infant, Newborn
  • Intelligence
  • Longitudinal Studies
  • Male
  • Motivation
  • Pregnancy
  • Queensland
  • Statistics as Topic
  • Suicide, Attempted
  • Thinking
  • Young Adult

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Is IQ in childhood associated with suicidal thoughts and attempts? Findings from the Mater University Study of Pregnancy and its outcomes'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this