Is low IQ associated with an increased risk of developing suicidal thoughts?

DJ Gunnell, RM Harbord, N Singleton, R Jenkins, G Lewis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Studies in young male conscripts suggest that low IQ scores are associated with an increased risk of suicide. Mechanisms underlying this association are unclear. Aim To investigate the association of IQ, as indexed by the national adult reading test (NART), with the incidence of, and recovery from, suicidal thoughts. Method An 18-month follow-up of 2,278 of the adults who took part in the Britain’s second national psychiatric morbidity survey who completed the NART at baseline. Results There was no evidence that poor performance on the NART was associated with an increased incidence of suicidal thoughts over the 18 month follow-up (adjusted odds ratio per 10 unit increase in NART-IQ 1.08 (95% CI 0.86–1.36). However, amongst the 155 subjects with suicidal thoughts at baseline, those with low NART-IQ were least likely to recover from them: the adjusted odds of recovery per 10 unit increase in NART-IQ was 1.42 (95% CI 0.96–2.10). Conclusion The association between low IQ and an increased risk of suicide may be because people with low IQ experience suicidal thoughts for more prolonged periods than those with high IQ or because low IQ increase the likelihood that people experiencing suicidal thoughts act upon them.
Translated title of the contributionIs low IQ associated with an increased risk of developing suicidal thoughts?
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)34 - 38
Number of pages5
JournalSocial Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology
Volume44 (1)
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2009

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