Is spiking logic the route to memristor-based computers?

Ella Gale, Ben De Lacy Costello, Andrew Adamatzky

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference Contribution (Conference Proceeding)

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Memristors have been suggested as a novel route to neuromorphic computing based on the similarity between neurons (synapses and ion pumps) and memristors. The D.C. action of the memristor is a current spike, which we think will be fruitful for building memristor computers. In this paper, we introduce 4 different logical assignations to implement sequential logic in the memristor and introduce the physical rules, summation, 'bounce-back', directionality and 'diminishing returns', elucidated from our investigations. We then demonstrate how memristor sequential logic works by instantiating a NOT gate, an AND gate and a Full Adder with a single memristor. The Full Adder makes use of the memristor's memory to add three binary values together and outputs the value, the carry digit and even the order they were input in.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2013 IEEE 20th International Conference on Electronics, Circuits, and Systems, ICECS 2013
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
Pages297-300
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)9781479924523
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Event2013 IEEE 20th International Conference on Electronics, Circuits, and Systems, ICECS 2013 - Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
Duration: 8 Dec 201311 Dec 2013

Conference

Conference2013 IEEE 20th International Conference on Electronics, Circuits, and Systems, ICECS 2013
CountryUnited Arab Emirates
CityAbu Dhabi
Period8/12/1311/12/13

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