Job insecurity and incident coronary heart disease: The Whitehall II prospective cohort study

Jane E. Ferrie*, Mika Kivimaki, Martin J. Shipley, George Davey Smith, Marianna Virtanen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study uses a prospective design to examine the association between self-reported job insecurity and incident coronary heart disease; an association which has been little investigated previously.

Methods: Participants were 4174 British civil servants (1236 women and 2938 men), aged 42 to 56 with self-reported data on job insecurity and free from coronary heart disease at baseline (1995-6). These participants were followed until 2002-4, an average of 8.6 years, for incident fatal coronary heart disease, clinically verified incident non-fatal myocardial infarction, or definite angina (a total of 168 events).

Results: Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for socio-demographic characteristics showed job insecurity to be associated with a 1.42-fold (95% CI, 1.05-1.93) risk of incident coronary heart disease compared with secure employment. Adjustment for physiological and behavioral cardiovascular risk factors had little effect on this estimate; 1.38 (1.01-1.88).

Conclusion: This study suggests that job insecurity may adversely affect coronary health. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)178-181
Number of pages4
JournalAtherosclerosis
Volume227
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2013

Keywords

  • Job insecurity
  • Stress
  • Incident coronary heart disease
  • Angina
  • Middle-aged
  • Prospective
  • ACUTE MYOCARDIAL-INFARCTION
  • ST-ELEVATION
  • FOLLOW-UP
  • HEALTH
  • CONSEQUENCES
  • COUNTRIES
  • MORTALITY
  • ANGINA
  • RATES
  • WOMEN

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