Landscapes of desire: parks, colonialism and identity in Victorian and Edwardian Ireland

Joanna Bruck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ireland’s Victorian and Edwardian public parks were landscapes in which normative models of class, gender, and colonial identities were constructed. This paper will explore how the materiality of these landscapes—their drinking fountains, railings, bandstands, and benches—facilitated forms of social practice that underpinned an ideology of improvement, creating regulated spaces of display and consumption in which the natural world and the urban populace could be objectified, domesticated and their moral worth evaluated. Yet, parks have always been sites of transgression so that from their earliest years, vandalism and other forms of subversive behavior created alternative narratives of identity.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)196-223
JournalInternational Journal of Historical Archaeology
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2013

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