Large tibial geode, which developed several years after a left medial Oxford unicondylar knee arthroplasty, treated with curettage and bone grafting

Matthew K. Curran*, James R. Murray

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

Abstract

Background: Tibial geodes are rare, and usually reported in association with rheumatoid arthritis. This case study reported the rare occurrence of a tibial geode in association with a left unicondylar knee arthroplasty (UKA). The patient, a 55-year-old male, was initially pleased with his UKA, which was performed at another institution. However, just over one year after the operation he began experiencing pain and discomfort. He did not present to the current institution until he was six years after UKA. This pain was movement and weight bearing related, although he still managed to maintain an active lifestyle working as a builder. After several years of follow-up, a computed tomography (CT) scan showed a significant increase in size of the geode. Methods: The patient initially did not want to undergo further surgery, as he was self-employed, but it was decided, in conjunction with the patient, that it was time to operate because the stability of the prothesis was in question. Transcortical and retrograde curettage of the geode was performed and one and a half femoral head allografts were used to fill the geode. Results: Follow-up since the operation showed good infilling of the geode and bone remodelling, with resolution of symptoms at 12 months. Conclusions: This case report was the first to report a symptomatic tibial geode in close association with UKA, which did not lead to revision surgery to total knee arthroplasty (TKA), but instead was successfully treated with currettage and bone grafting.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)722-727
Number of pages6
JournalKnee
Volume25
Issue number4
Early online date8 Jul 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2018

Keywords

  • Athroplasty
  • Curettage
  • Cyst
  • Geode
  • Prosthesis

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