Learning how to learn and active citizenship: different currency or twin sides of the same coin? submitted

RE Deakin Crick, B Hoskins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the context of the European Union Framework of Key Competences and the need to develop indicators for European Union member states to measure progress made towards the ‘knowledge economy’ and ‘greater social cohesion’ both the learning to learn and the active citizenship competences have been highlighted. However, what have yet to be discussed are the links and the overlaps between these two competences. Based on the development of research projects on these two fields, this article will compare the two sets of competences, both qualitatively and quantitatively. It will describe how the values and dispositions that motivate and inform active citizenship and learning to learn are related to each other, both empirically and theoretically. Both these competences are tools for empowering individuals and giving them the motivation and autonomy to control their own lives beyond the social circumstances in which they find themselves. In the case of active citizenship, the ability to be able to participate in society and voice their concerns, ensure their rights and the rights of others. In the case of learning to learn to be able to participate in work and everyday life by being empowered to learn and update the constantly changing competences required to successfully manage your life plans. When measuring both these competences then certain values relating positively towards democracy and human rights are common in their development.
Translated title of the contributionLearning how to learn and active citizenship: different currency or twin sides of the same coin? submitted
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)121 - 127
JournalEuropean Research Journal
Volume45.1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

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