Locating task-objective relevant information in text

MGM Groen, JM Noyes

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference Contribution (Conference Proceeding)

Abstract

Human task performance in dynamic and complex systems is considerably impaired by the reduced ability of operators to locate and act on task-relevant information. It is suggested that the highlighting of task-relevant information would facilitate expedient establishment of task objectives. This suggestion has been tested experimentally by investigating whether this task-relevant information can be located with relevancy markers. In telephone and email conversations it was found that across task (i.e. finance and logistics) and language (i.e. Dutch, English and Mandarin-Chinese) domains, humans seem to benefit from the presence of these markers when localising relevant information. It is suggested that this work has the potential to be used to inform the design of tasks and user interfaces of complex and other systems where user interaction is needed.
Translated title of the contributionLocating task-objective relevant information in text
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAnnual Meeting of the Europe Chapter of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, University of Sheffield
EditorsD de Waard, G R J Hockey, P Nickel, K Brookhuis
PublisherShaker Publishing, Maastricht, the Netherlands
Pages387 - 398
Number of pages11
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2007
EventHuman Factors Issues in Complex System Performance - Maastricht, Netherlands
Duration: 1 Jan 20071 Jan 2007

Conference

ConferenceHuman Factors Issues in Complex System Performance
CountryNetherlands
CityMaastricht
Period1/01/071/01/07

Bibliographical note

Name and Venue of Event: University of Sheffield
Conference Proceedings/Title of Journal: Human Factors Issues in Complex System Performance
Conference Organiser: The Europe Chapter of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society

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