Long-term clinical outcomes following surgery for spontaneous pneumothorax caused by pulmonary blebs and bullae in dogs – a multicentre (AVSTS Research Cooperative) retrospective study

C. L. Howes*, J. P. Sumner, K. Ahlstrand, R. J. Hardie, D. Anderson, S. Woods, D. Goh, B. de la Puerta, H. N. Brissot, S. Das, M. Nolff, L. Liehmann, G. Chanoit

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

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Abstract

Objectives: To report the clinical characteristics and recurrence rate of spontaneous pneumothorax secondary to pulmonary blebs and bullae following surgical management in a large cohort of dogs. To explore potential risk factors for recurrence and describe outcome. 

Materials and Methods: Medical records were retrospectively reviewed for cases with spontaneous pneumothorax managed surgically between 2000 and 2017. Signalment, clinical presentation, diagnostic imaging, surgery, histopathology findings and patient outcomes were recorded. Follow-up was performed via patient records and telephone contact. 

Results: Records of 120 dogs with surgically treated pneumothorax were identified and reviewed, with 99 cases appropriate for exploratory statistical analysis. Median follow-up was 850 days (range: 9–5105 days). Two- and 5-year survival rates were 88.4% and 83.5%, respectively. There was recurrence in 14 of 99 dogs (14.1%) with adequate follow-up, with a median time to recurrence of 25 days (1–1719 days). Univariable Cox regression analysis suggested increased risk for recurrence in giant breeds (hazard ratio = 11.05, 95% confidence interval: 2.82–43.35) and with increasing bodyweight (HR = 1.04, 95% confidence interval: 1.00–1.09). Of 14 dogs with recurrence, six were euthanased, two died of causes related to pneumothorax and six underwent further treatment, of which five were resolved. 

Clinical Significance: Long-term survival for dogs with surgically managed spontaneous pneumothorax was good and associated with a low risk of recurrence. Giant breed dogs and increased bodyweight were the only variables identified as possible risk factors for recurrence. The outcome for dogs with recurrence undergoing a second intervention was also favourable.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Small Animal Practice
Early online date13 May 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 13 May 2020
EventECVS Annual Scientific Meeting - Budapest, Hungary
Duration: 4 Jul 20196 Jul 2019
Conference number: 28
https://www.ecvs.org/services/asm_2019.php

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