Long-term follow-up of incontinence and urge complaints after intensive urotherapy in childhood (75 patients followed up for 16.2-21.8 years)

Marianne A W Vijverberg, Eva Stortelder, Laetitia M O de Kort, Esther T Kok, Tom P V M de Jong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To reassess the incontinence and urge complaints in adults who had undergone inpatient urotherapy during childhood and compare the results with the short-term outcomes.

METHODS: From 1987 to 1990, 95 children (13 boys and 82 girls; age 6-17 years) underwent hospitalized urotherapy to treat functional lower urinary tract symptoms. This group was traced and a questionnaire was administered by telephone. The long-term data on incontinence and urge complaints were compared with the results at 6 months after training.

RESULTS: Of the 95 patients, 92 were traced, and a cohort of 75 could be analyzed. At long-term follow-up (mean 17.9 years), of the 75 patients, 63 (84%) had a good, 8 (11%) a moderate, and 4 (5%) a poor outcome. At short-term follow-up, 56 of the current 75 patients had had a good outcome, and at long-term follow-up, 47 of these 56 patients still had a good score. However, during the intervening period, 3 of these 56 patients developed incontinence recurrence and scored a poor result, and 6 others scored a moderate result. Originally, after 6 months of follow-up, 7 patients had had a moderate outcome; 5 of these had improved to good, 1 still scored moderate, and 1 had deteriorated over time to poor. Twelve patients had originally had a poor outcome at short-term follow-up. Of these, 11 had spontaneously improved to good and 1 to moderate.

CONCLUSION: If the original outcomes of pediatric intensive inpatient urotherapy are good, they tend to remain so over time in most patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1391-6
Number of pages6
JournalUrology
Volume78
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2011

Bibliographical note

Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Behavior Therapy
  • Biofeedback, Psychology
  • Child
  • Female
  • Follow-Up Studies
  • Humans
  • Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms
  • Male
  • Patient Education as Topic
  • Recurrence
  • Time Factors
  • Treatment Outcome
  • Urinary Incontinence

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