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Magma fragmentation in highly explosive basaltic eruptions induced by rapid crystallisation

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • Fabio Arzilli
  • G. La Spina
  • Mike Burton
  • Margherita Polacci
  • Nolwenn Le Gall
  • Margaret Hartley
  • Danilo Di Genova
  • Biao Cai
  • Nghia Vo
  • Emily Bamber
  • Sara Nonni
  • Robert Atwood
  • Ed Llewellin
  • Richard Brooker
  • Heidy Mader
  • Peter Lee
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages9
JournalNature Geoscience
DOIs
DateAccepted/In press - 10 Sep 2019
DatePublished (current) - 21 Oct 2019

Abstract

Basaltic eruptions are the most common form of volcanism on Earth and planetary bodies. The low viscosity of basaltic magmas inhibits fragmentation, favouring effusive and lava-fountaining activity, yet highly explosive, hazardous basaltic eruptions do occur. The processes that promote fragmentation of basaltic magma remain unclear, and are subject to debate. Here, we use a numerical conduit model to show that rapid ascent of magma during explosive eruption produces large undercooling. Novel in situ experiments reveal that undercooling drives exceptionally rapid (~minutes) crystallisation, inducing a step-change in viscosity that triggers magma fragmentation. Experimentally-produced textures are consistent with products of basaltic Plinian eruptions. We apply the numerical model to investigate basaltic magma fragmentation over a wide parameter space and find that all basaltic volcanoes have the potential to produce highly explosive eruptions. The critical requirements are initial magma temperatures lower than 1100 °C, in order to reach a syn-eruptive crystal content of > 30 vol.%, and thus a magma viscosity ≥ 105 Pa s, which our results suggest is the minimum viscosity required for the fragmentation of fast ascending basaltic magmas. Our study provides both a demonstration and explanation of the processes that drive basaltic Plinian eruptions, revealing how typically effusive basaltic volcanoes can produce unexpected highly explosive, and hazardous, eruptions.

    Research areas

  • Petrology, Volcanology

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  • Full-text PDF (accepted author manuscript)

    Rights statement: This is the author accepted manuscript (AAM). The final published version (version of record) is available online via Springer Nature at https://www.nature.com/articles/s41561-019-0468-6#article-info. Please refer to any applicable terms of use of the publisher.

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