Making plexuses accessible: the use of ‘tube-map’ style schematics in Medical Anatomy: Abstract presented (poster) at the Summer Scientific Meeting of the British Association of Clinical Anatomists, Cambridge, UK.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceConference Posterpeer-review

Abstract

An understanding of the major nerve plexuses is essential to the study of anatomy. However, the intricacy of the plexuses can make interpretation difficult. During teaching, they are often misunderstood with students failing to correlate the highly detailed, 3-dimensional cadaveric structures with the 2-dimensional figures found in their texts.The root values of the terminal nerves are important and relevant for medical students to understand. Some illustrations simply list the nerve roots, requiring students to learn by rote. We hypothesised that a simple illustration of the plexuses, colour-coded to denote spinal root contributions, could better facilitate the appreciation of this information. To our knowledge, no illustration of the lumbosacral plexus contains this information, and whilst a similar illustration of the brachial plexus is publicly available, it can be considered overly complicated for first year medical students. Faculty and students were consulted on the design and functionality of the schematics. Verbal feedback (in classes) from students was positive, with requests for the schematics to be included in learning materials. Faculty feedback (online survey) centred on colour and complexity and suggestions of how the figures might fit specific specialties. The feedback has allowed refinement of these diagrams for dissemination and use in teaching.
Original languageEnglish
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Feb 2019

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