Making Social Work Count: A Curriculum Innovation to Teach Quantitative Research Methods and Statistical Analysis to Undergraduate Social Work Students in the United Kingdom

Barbra Teater, Jessica Roy, John Carpenter, Donald Forrester, John Devaney, Jonathan Scourfield

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
370 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Students in the United Kingdom (UK) are found to lack knowledge and skills in quantitative research methods. To address this gap, a quantitative research method and statistical analysis curriculum comprising 10 individual lessons was developed, piloted, and evaluated at two universities The evaluation found that BSW students’ (N = 81) self-efficacy improved significantly from pre- to posttest, but statistical knowledge improved only slightly and the improvement was not statistically significant. The findings point to recommendations for social work educators in the UK and beyond to consider when integrating the 10-input quantitative method curriculum and when teaching research methods and statistics to undergraduate social work students.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)422-437
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Teaching in Social Work
Volume37
Issue number5
Early online date27 Oct 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Oct 2017

Keywords

  • BSW students
  • Teaching Research
  • Curriculum Development
  • Quantitative Methods
  • Statistics
  • Research Self-Efficacy

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