Mammalian Choices: combining fast-but-inaccurate and slow-but-accurate decision-making systems

Peter Trimmer, Alasdair I Houston, James Marshall, Rafal Bogacz, E S Paul, Michael T Mendl, John M McNamara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

88 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Empirical findings suggest that the mammalian brain has two decision-making systems that act at different speeds. We represent the faster system using standard signal detection theory. We represent the slower (but more accurate) cortical system as the integration of sensory evidence over time until a certain level of confidence is reached. We then consider how two such systems should be combined optimally for a range of information linkage mechanisms. We conclude with some performance predictions that will hold if our representation is realistic.
Translated title of the contributionMammalian Choices: combining fast-but-inaccurate and slow-but-accurate decision-making systems
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2353 - 2361
Number of pages9
JournalProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Volume275
Issue number1649
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Oct 2008

Bibliographical note

Publisher: Royal Society of London

Keywords

  • Animals
  • Behavior, Animal
  • Cerebral Cortex
  • Decision Making
  • Mammals
  • Models, Neurological
  • Thalamus

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