Managing urban areas for insect pollinators: As town and cities continue to grow how can land managers help insect pollinators in urban areas?

Katherine Baldock, Mark A. Goddard, William E. Kunin, Simon G. Potts, Graham N. Stone, Jane Memmott

Research output: Other contribution

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Abstract

Insect pollinators are essential for food production and wild flower reproduction yet these important insects are declining in the UK and in other regions of the world. Multiple pressures including land use change, disease, climate change and agrochemicals affect pollinator populations and the services they provide. This has resulted in declining species richness in wild pollinator populations and local declines in abundance. Urban areas make up 9% of the land area in the UK and are growing. With the majority of the UK population living in urban areas there is huge pressure in these landscapes for plants and animals, including pollinators, to coexist. Therefore it is important that we manage our towns and cities favourably for insect pollinators.
Original languageEnglish
TypePolicy and Practice Note
Media of outputPrinted guidance sheet
PublisherLiving With Environmental Change network
Number of pages4
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2015

Publication series

NameLWEC - Policy and practice notes
PublisherLiving With Environmental Change network
No.20

Structured keywords

  • Cabot Institute City Futures Research
  • Cabot Institute Food Security Research
  • Cabot Institute Environmental Change Research

Keywords

  • pollinators
  • urban
  • policy
  • practice
  • land management
  • National Pollinator Strategy

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