Mapping the changing residential geography of White British secondary school children in England using visually balanced cartograms and hexograms

Richard Harris, Martin Charlton, Chris Brunsdon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
319 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

In the context of debates about segregation within the UK, this paper maps the residential geography of two groups of White British school children, one of which was in secondary school in 2011 and the other in 2017. To present that geography, hexograms are introduced as a complement to visually balanced cartograms, both of which seek to address the problems of invisibility and distortion encountered with more conventional choropleth and cartogram maps. The nature of these problems is introduced, our solutions discussed, and the methods applied to the case study, which allow changes in the geography to be seen.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)65-72
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Maps
Volume14
Issue number1
Early online date13 Jun 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Keywords

  • choropleth map
  • cartogram
  • hexogram
  • segregation
  • England
  • pupils

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