Marginalisation, Grenfell Tower and the voice of the social-housing resident: a critical juncture in housing law and policy?

Helen Carr, Dave Cowan, Edward I Kirton-Darling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
114 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This paper draws on historical institutionalism to consider the impact of housing-policy responses following the Grenfell fire on the marginalisation of the social-housing resident. We consider three specific policy responses: reform focused on conditions of rented properties; the social-housing White Paper; and building regulation and building-safety reforms. We suggest that, in historical institutionalist terms, each is part of a matrix of reform in which understandings of the social-housing resident play a critical role. We argue that rather than the fire provoking a paradigm shift in the recognition that government accords to the ignored and stigmatised citizens who live in social housing, the policy initiatives to date indicate a much more limited adjustment of policy within a normal frame. We suggest that this is because housing policy is dominated by a consumerist ideology that is self-reinforcing and ignores the social, economic and political complexity of tenure.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)10-24
Number of pages15
JournalInternational Journal of Law in Context
Volume18
Issue number1
Early online date6 Apr 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
Copyright © The Author(s), 2022. Published by Cambridge University Press.

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