Maternal smoking during pregnancy and offspring smoking initiation: Assessing the role of intrauterine exposure

Amy E. Taylor*, Laura D. Howe, Jon E. Heron, Jennifer J. Ware, Matthew Hickman, Marcus R. Munafo

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

AimsTo assess whether associations between maternal smoking during pregnancy and offspring smoking initiation are due to intrauterine mechanisms.

DesignComparison of associations of maternal and partner smoking behaviour during pregnancy with offspring smoking initiation using partner smoking as a negative control (n=6484) and a Mendelian randomization analysis (n=1020), using a genetic variant in the mothers as a proxy for smoking cessation during pregnancy.

SettingA longitudinal birth cohort in South West England.

ParticipantsParticipants of the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC).

MeasurementsSmoking status during pregnancy was self-reported by mother and partner in questionnaires administered at pregnancy. Latent classes of offspring smoking initiation (non-smokers, experimenters, late-onset regular smokers and early-onset regular smokers) were previously developed from questionnaires administered at 14-16 years. A genetic variant, rs1051730, was genotyped in the mothers.

FindingsBoth mother and partner smoking were similarly positively associated with offspring smoking initiation classes, even after adjustment for confounders. Odds ratios (OR) [95% confidence interval (CI)] for class membership compared with non-smokers were: experimenters: mother OR=1.33 (95% CI=1.06, 1.67), partner OR=1.28 (95% CI=1.06, 1.55), late-onset regular smokers: mother OR=1.80 (95% CI=1.43, 2.26), partner OR=1.86 (95% CI=1.52, 2.28) and early-onset regular smokers: mother OR=2.89 (95% CI=2.12, 3.94), partner OR=2.50 (95% CI=1.85, 3.37). There was no clear evidence for a dose-response effect of either mother or partner smoking heaviness on class membership. Maternal rs1051730 genotype was not clearly associated with offspring smoking initiation class in pre-pregnancy smokers (P=0.35).

ConclusionThe association between smoking during pregnancy and offspring smoking initiation does not appear to operate through intrauterine mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1013-1021
Number of pages9
JournalAddiction
Volume109
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2014

Bibliographical note

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Structured keywords

  • Brain and Behaviour
  • Tobacco and Alcohol

Keywords

  • ALSPAC
  • intrauterine
  • maternal smoking
  • Mendelian randomization
  • negative control
  • offspring smoking
  • pregnancy
  • tobacco
  • PRENATAL NICOTINE EXPOSURE
  • SELF-REPORTED SMOKING
  • ADOLESCENT SMOKING
  • TOBACCO EXPOSURE
  • SUBSTANCE USE
  • GENE-CLUSTER
  • BEHAVIOR
  • MOTHERS
  • RISK
  • METAANALYSIS

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