Measuring affective advertising: Implications of low attention processing on recall

Robert Heath*, Agnes Nairn

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article (Academic Journal)peer-review

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article is about affective advertising, defined as that which works more on our emotions and feelings than on our knowledge and beliefs. This sort of advertising can be processed effectively at relatively low levels of attention and as a result does not always perform well on recall measures. We compare the most popular recall-based metric - claimed advertising awareness - against an approach that deduces effectiveness from recognition and find claimed advertising awareness seriously underestimates the effectiveness of the advertising tested.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)269-291
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Advertising Research
Volume45
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2005

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