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Mechanically Robust Gels Formed from Hydrophobized Cellulose Nanocrystals

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)19318-19322
Number of pages5
JournalACS Applied Materials and Interfaces
Volume10
Issue number23
Early online date23 May 2018
DOIs
DateAccepted/In press - 23 May 2018
DateE-pub ahead of print - 23 May 2018
DatePublished (current) - 13 Jun 2018

Abstract

Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) that bind to each other through associative hydrophobic interactions have been synthesized by modifying sulfated CNCs (sCNCs) with hydrophobic moieties. These octyl-CNCs form gels at significantly lower concentrations than parent sCNCs, producing extremely strong hydrogels. Unlike sCNCs, these octyl-CNCs do not form ordered liquid crystalline phases indicating a random association into a robust network driven by hydrophobic interactions. Furthermore, involvement of the octyl-CNCs into multicomponent supramolecular assembly was demonstrated in combination with starch. AFM studies confirm favorable interactions between starch and octyl-CNCs, which is thought to be the source of the dramatic increase in gel strength.

    Research areas

  • adhesive force, cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), gels, rheology, starch

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  • Full-text PDF (accepted author manuscript)

    Rights statement: This is the author accepted manuscript (AAM). The final published version (version of record) is available online via ACS at https://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/acsami.8b05067 . Please refer to any applicable terms of use of the publisher.

    Accepted author manuscript, 503 KB, PDF document

    Licence: CC BY

  • Supplementary information PDF

    Rights statement: This is the author accepted manuscript (AAM). The final published version (version of record) is available online via ACS at https://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/acsami.8b05067 . Please refer to any applicable terms of use of the publisher.

    Accepted author manuscript, 612 KB, PDF document

    Licence: CC BY

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