Menstrual irregularities are more common in adolescents with type 1 diabetes: association with poor glycaemic control and weight gain

C J Adcock, L A Perry, D R Lindsell, A M Taylor, J M Holly, J Jones, D B Dunger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ovarian function in post-menarchal girls with Type 1 diabetes was evaluated. Menstrual histories from 24 adolescents with Type 1 diabetes were compared with those from 24 age and sex matched controls. A fasting blood sample was obtained from subjects with Type 1 diabetes for the measurement of ovarian and adrenal sex hormones, LH and FSH, glucose and insulin, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1); and an ovarian ultrasound scan was performed. Menstrual irregularity was more prevalent in patients with Type 1 diabetes than controls (54% vs 21%, p <0.01) and their mean body mass index (BMI) was greater (22.3 +/- 0.5 (+/- SEM) vs 20.7 +/- 0.6 kg m-2, p <0.05). Subjects with Type 1 diabetes with irregular menses (when compared with diabetic subjects with a regular cycle) had a significantly higher HbA1 (12.8 +/- 0.4 vs 10.5 +/- 0.5%, p <0.01) and BMI (23.2 +/- 0.6 vs 21.4 +/- 0.6 kg m-2, p <0.05) associated with a lower sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) (37.2 +/- 4.0 vs 52.6 +/- 4.0 nmol l-1, p <0.025) and IGF-I (1.4 +/- 0.2 vs 2.2 +/- 0.2 mUI-1, p <0.025) and a higher LH:FSH ratio (2.6 +/- 0.5 vs 1.4 +/- 0.2, p <0.05). Polycystic ovarian changes were identified in 10/13 (77%) of these patients with an irregular cycle. Menstrual irregularity is common in post-menarchal girls with Type 1 diabetes and is associated with poor glycaemic control and weight gain. The apparent high incidence of polycystic ovarian change requires further investigation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)465-70
Number of pages6
JournalDiabetic Medicine
Volume11
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 1994

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