Middle Holocene hunting and herding at Gueldaman Cave, Algeria: An integrated study of the vertebrate fauna and pottery lipid residues

Farid Kherbouche, Julie Dunne, S Merzoug, S Hachi, Richard Evershed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)
417 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Pathways to food production in Holocene north Africa are complex and varied and, for the human groups living there, are likely heavily influenced by varying factors such as local ecosystems and available resources. Molecular and isotopic analysis of absorbed food residues from 140 pottery vessels from Neolithic Gueldaman Cave site confirms that the exploitation of domesticated animals (sheep and goat), for their carcass fats, and their secondary products, e.g. dairy, began in Mediterranean north Africa in the 5th millennium BC. Findings from organic residue analyses are confirmed by the slaughter profiles from the faunal assemblage which suggest a mixed meat/milk economy.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)50-60
Number of pages11
JournalQuaternary International
Volume410
Early online date12 Feb 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 Jul 2016

Keywords

  • Neolithic
  • Gueldaman
  • Algeria
  • Organic residues

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