Minimal residual disease status as a predictor of relapse after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

C J Knechtli, N J Goulden, J P Hancock, E L Harris, R J Garland, C G Jones, V L Grandage, A W Rowbottom, A F Green, E Clarke, A W Lankester, M N Potter, J M Cornish, D H Pamphilon, C G Steward, A Oakhill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

83 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We have analysed the behaviour of minimal residual disease (MRD) after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT) in 71 children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). The method relied on PCR of IgH, TCRdelta and/or TCRgamma gene rearrangements followed by electrophoretic size resolution and allele-specific oligoprobing. Patients were similarly conditioned; 55 received marrow from unrelated donors and 16 from related donors. MRD was assessed at various time-points up to 24 months after BMT. Three children were not evaluable due to transplant-related mortality. MRD was detected in 28/32 patients (88%) who relapsed post-BMT; 16 were positive at all times and 12 were initially negative but became positive at a median of 3 months (range 1.5-11) prior to relapse. In contrast, only eight of 36 (22%) patients who remained in continuing complete remission (CCR) (median follow-up 43 months, range 20-94) showed MRD at any time after BMT (P
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)860-71
Number of pages12
JournalBritish Journal of Haematology
Volume102
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1998

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Bone Marrow Transplantation
  • Child
  • Child, Preschool
  • Humans
  • Infant
  • Infant, Newborn
  • Neoplasm, Residual
  • Oligonucleotide Probes
  • Polymerase Chain Reaction
  • Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma
  • Recurrence
  • Transplantation, Homologous

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