Mobility and the diversity of early Neolithic lives: Isotopic evidence from skeletons

R. Alexander Bentley*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Isotopic analyses of tooth enamel from early Neolithic skeletons in southern Germany adds diversity to the picture of the Neolithic transition in central Europe, which has often been described as a wholesale shift in diet and technology. Over the past decade, these isotopic studies have suggested some degree of immigration from nearby indigenous groups, as well as social differences within early Neolithic communities that correlate with immigration patterns. In general, there emerges pattern a pattern of patrilocal kinship that is consistent with independent genetic evidence, and anthropologically consistent with the potential identification of Neolithic 'nuclear families'; and finally, specialisation of subsistence activities, such as livestock herding and cultivating, probably along hereditary lines. (c) 2012 Published by Elsevier Inc.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)303-312
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Anthropological Archaeology
Volume32
Issue number3
Early online date18 May 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2013

Keywords

  • Mobility
  • Specialisation
  • Community diversity
  • Linearbandkeramik
  • Central Europe
  • EUROPEAN POPULATION HISTORY
  • SEX-BIASED MIGRATION
  • STRONTIUM ISOTOPES
  • ANCIENT DNA
  • PIG DOMESTICATION
  • HUMAN DISPERSALS
  • TOOTH ENAMEL
  • 1ST FARMERS
  • TRANSITION
  • GERMANY

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