More rain, less soil: long-term changes in rainfall intensity with climate change

Tim P. Burt, John Boardman, Ian Foster, Nicholas Howden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

34 Citations (Scopus)
343 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This commentary discusses the role of long-term climate change in driving increases in soil erosion. Assuming that land use and management remain effectively constant, we discuss changes in the ability of rainfall to cause erosion (erosivity), using long daily rainfall data sets from south east England. An upward trend in mean rainfall per rain day is detected at the century-plus time scale. Implications for soil erosion and sediment delivery are discussed and evidence from other regions reviewed. We conclude that rates of soil erosion may well increase in a warmer, wetter world.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)563-566
Number of pages4
JournalEarth Surface Processes and Landforms
Volume41
Early online date21 Dec 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Mar 2016

Keywords

  • soil erosion
  • erosivity
  • climate change

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