Muscle fatigue examined at different temperatures in experiments on intact mammalian (rat) muscle fibers

H Roots, G Ball, J Talbot-Ponsoby, M King, K McBeath, KW Ranatunga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

Abstract

In experiments on small bundles of intact fibers from a rat fast muscle, in vitro, we examined the decline in force in repeated tetanic contractions; the aim was to characterize the effect of shortening and of temperature on the initial phase of muscle fatigue. Short tetanic contractions were elicited at a control repetition rate of 1/60 s, and fatigue was induced by raising the rate to 1/5 s for 2-3 min, both in isometric mode (no shortening) and in shortening mode, in which each tetanic contraction included a ramp shortening at a standard velocity. In experiments at 20 degrees C (n = 12), the force decline during a fatigue run was 25% in the isometric mode but was significantly higher (35%) in the shortening mode. In experiments at different temperatures (10-30 degrees C, n = 11), the tetanic frequency and duration were adjusted as appropriate, and for shortening mode, the velocity was adjusted for maximum power output. In isometric mode, fatigue of force was significantly less at 30 degrees C ( approximately 20%) than at 10 degrees C ( approximately 30%); the power output (force x velocity) was >10x higher at 30 degrees C than at 10 degrees C, and power decline during a fatigue run was less at 30 degrees C ( approximately 20-30%) than at 10 degrees C ( approximately 50%). The finding that the extent of fatigue is increased with shortening contractions and is lower at higher temperatures is consistent with the view that force depression by inorganic phosphate, which accumulates within fibers during activity, may be a primary cause of initial muscle fatigue.
Translated title of the contributionMuscle fatigue examined at different temperatures in experiments on intact mammalian (rat) muscle fibers
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)378 - 384
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume106
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2009

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Muscle fatigue examined at different temperatures in experiments on intact mammalian (rat) muscle fibers'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this