Negotiating Essentialised Cultural and Gendered Differences in a Global world: Brazilians in London (Published in English and Portuguese)

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Abstract

In the last decades, transnational scholars have analysed the role of social ties in producing connections link- ing people in different places of the world within a context of intense mobility of people and goods in the so-called ‘mobile era’. In discus- sions of ethnicity, nationality and the formation of ‘ethnic communi- ty’ abroad, transnational studies, nevertheless, often far too easily celebrate the ‘ethnic commonality’ constituting ties of affinity based on shared cultural experience. Yet, there is a lack of understanding of the transnationalist migratory experience in relation to colonial legacies and to the multiple distinctions existing among and between migrants. In this article I contribute to the discussion on transna- tional experience by demonstrating how Brazilians in London are constantly re-signifying and negotiating essentialised and stigma- tised representations of cultural differences, intersected with gender and ‘race’, when speaking about and interacting with each other as well to western European/British people. The findings are result of a mixed methods approach, which combines ethnography in places of leisure frequented by Brazilians in London, generated over 18 months (from July 2013 to January 2015), as well as 33 in-depth interviews with Brazilians in London.
Translated title of the contributionNegotiating Essentialised Cultural and Gendered Differences in a Global world: Brazilians in London (Published in English and Portuguese)
Original languagePortuguese
Pages (from-to)159 - 194
Number of pages37
JournalSéculo XXI, Revista de Ciências Sociais
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2019

Keywords

  • difference
  • transnational studies
  • culture and gender
  • Brazilian migration

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