No Own-Age Advantage in Children's Recognition of Emotion on Prototypical Faces of Different Ages

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We test whether there is an own-age advantage in emotion recognition using prototypical younger child, older child and adult faces displaying emotional expressions. Prototypes were created by averaging photographs of individuals from 6 different age and sex categories (male 5-8 years, male 9-12 years, female 5-8 years, female 9-12 years, adult male and adult female), each posing 6 basic emotional expressions. In the study 5-8 year old children (n = 33), 9-13 year old children (n = 70) and adults (n = 92) labelled these expression prototypes in a 6-alternative forced-choice task. There was no evidence that children or adults recognised expressions better on faces from their own age group. Instead, child facial expression prototypes were recognised as accurately as adult expression prototypes by all age groups. This suggests there is no substantial own-age advantage in children's emotion recognition.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0125256
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume10
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 May 2015

Structured keywords

  • Memory

Keywords

  • Emotion Recognition
  • Own-Age Bias
  • Social Development

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