Not all campaigns are created equal: Temporal and spatial variability in constituency campaign spending effects in Great Britain, 1997–2015

Charles Pattie*, Todd K. Hartman, Ron Johnston

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)
4 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Existing research on constituency campaigning focuses heavily on studies of single national elections, and cross-temporal variability in campaign effects is rarely addressed. Similarly, campaign effects for a party at a given election are assumed to be uniform across the territory of the relevant polity. But both assumptions are questionable. In this paper, we analyse constituency campaign spending effects at British General Elections from 1997 to 2015 to explore their stability across time and space. In doing so, we also evaluate the empirical utility of some of the arguments theorised by Fisher, Cutts, and Fieldhouse (2011) to explain campaign variability. Our results suggest parts of the theory, while attractive, do not adequately account for the observed variability.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)36-46
Number of pages11
JournalPolitical Geography
Volume71
Early online date7 Mar 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2019

Keywords

  • Campaign spending effects
  • Constituency campaigning
  • Electoral geography

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