Opening new frontiers in colonial Spanish American history: new perspectives on indigenous-Spanish interactions on the margins of empire

C A Williams

Research output: Working paperWorking paper and Preprints

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Abstract

Over the past decade, the frontiers of Latin America have received an important scholarly boost, thanks to the research of a number of scholars who have shifted the focus away from the sedentary societies that the Spanish encountered in Mesoamerica and the Andean region to examine the protracted and difficult process whereby Spaniards incorporated, or attempted to incorporate, the mainly non-sedentary or semi-sedentary peoples who inhabited the margins of empire. Common to all these studies is a concern to explore the agency of indigenous peoples, and as this essay will show, they shed new light on, and contribute greatly to our understanding of, Indian responses to the challenges posed by Spanish colonization and missionization in regions long neglected in the historical literature.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2007

Bibliographical note

Terms of use: This preprint article has been submitted and is currently under consideration for publication in the journal History Compass (Blackwell).

Keywords

  • frontier colonisation
  • frontier missions
  • Colonial Latin America

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