Opposite turning behavior in right-handers and non-right-handers suggests a link between handedness and cerebral dopamine asymmetries

C Mohr, T Landis, HS Bracha, P Brugger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The strong right hand preference in humans remains a riddle; no lateralized behavior other than fine finger dexterity relates to it. The relation between handedness and language dominance may be far weaker than currently judged; after all, both right-handers and non-right-handers utilize the left brain for speech. There is, however, a lateralized motor preference in animals, turning behavior, that is strongly associated with hemispheric dopamine (DA) asymmetries. Turning consistently occurs towards the side with less DA. The authors tested 69 right-handers and 24 non-right-handers with a device recording spontaneous turning behavior for 20 hr within 3 days. Findings indicate that right-handers preferred left-sided turning and non-right-handers preferred right-sided turning. This result suggests a link between handedness and DA asymmetries.
Translated title of the contributionOpposite turning behavior in right-handers and non-right-handers suggests a link between handedness and cerebral dopamine asymmetries
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1448 - 1452
Number of pages5
JournalBehavioral Neuroscience
Volume117 (6)
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2003

Bibliographical note

Publisher: American Psychological Society

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