Orthographic input coding: A review of behavioral data and current models

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter in a book

Abstract

Successful identification of a printed word requires the reader to construct an orthographic input code-a representation that encodes both the identity and the order of the letters in the input stimulus. There is now a very considerable body of evidence relating to orthographic input coding. In this chapter, I review and synthesize this evidence in order to establish a set of behavioural criteria that a successful model of orthographic input coding must satisfy. I then assess the ability of existing models to satisfy these criteria. None of these models succeed in satisfying all of the criteria, and I will argue that this is due to fundamental problems with the way in which letter order is coded in these models. In the final part of the chapter, I very briefly review an alternative approach to orthographic input coding, which may offer a more promising approach (Davis, submitted, 1999).
Translated title of the contributionOrthographic input coding: A review of behavioral data and current models
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationFrom Inkmarks to Ideas
Subtitle of host publicationCurrent Issues in Lexical Processing
PublisherPsychology Press Ltd
ISBN (Print)9781136897160
Publication statusPublished - 2005

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