Ouster clauses, separation of powers and the intention of parliament: from Anisminic to Privacy International

Robert J T Craig*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

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Abstract

Reflects on the constitutional implications of ouster clauses, especially regarding separation of powers. Discusses the approach adopted in Anisminic Ltd v Foreign Compensation Commission (HL), the case's subsequent application, and the impact of R. (on the application of Privacy International) v Investigatory Powers Tribunal (CA). Considers whether a distinction should be drawn between clauses addressed to judicial and administrative bodies.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)570-584
JournalPublic Law
Volume4
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2018

Keywords

  • Judicial review
  • Legislative intention
  • Ouster clauses
  • Separation of powers

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